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Sorghum hybrids make a great pair

SOLID CROP: Paul Haeusler at Kaimkillenbun planted both Pioneer hybrid G56 and Pioneer hybrid G22 last season, with both performing well under the conditions of the year.
SOLID CROP: Paul Haeusler at Kaimkillenbun planted both Pioneer hybrid G56 and Pioneer hybrid G22 last season, with both performing well under the conditions of the year. Contributed

A MIX of sorghum hybrids was an excellent combination for Kaimkillenbun's Paul Haeusler.

Mr Haeusler, of "Bundaleer", had Pioneer hybrid G56 and Pioneer hybrid G22 planted last season, with both performing well under the conditions of the year.

G56 has been grown for many seasons on the property, in a range of situations, and had proven a reliable option.

Last year it was sown into a paddock fallowed through from sunflowers that were harvested 18 months earlier and started with a full profile of moisture.

A sowing date that was relatively early in the season helped the crop establish before the heat of summer but needed a hybrid with good early vigour in colder, wetter conditions.

Mr Haeusler used a Norseman planter to sow the seed at 80,000 per hectare into 90cm row spacings.

There wasn't any up-front fertiliser following the long fallow, although the sorghum did receive an application of Starter Z at 11kg per hectare. Post-emergent applications of Dual, Atrozine and Starane herbicide were used for weed control.

At harvest, G56 produced an average yield of 7.5 tonnes per hectare and grain of a nice bright colour and consistent size. The crop was categorised as Sorghum 1, with screenings at just 2-3%.

G56 has been a consistent performer on the property for many years and impressed with its disease resistance and standability.

Last year there wasn't any lodging in the sorghum during the season and it also stood very well after being sprayed out with a combination of Roundup CT and Ammonia Sulphate.

The crop was harvested in March.

Mr Haeusler also had a good result from the newer G22 hybrid, which was planted more than a month after G56 on October 25.

That particular paddock had grown a sorghum crop the previous year that was not harvested until June and had been fallowed through until enough moisture became available to plant.

Haeusler said the success of G22 would lead to more of it being grown on the property in the coming year and it is likely to be included in an earlier plant.

The hybrid demonstrated good cold tolerance last season.

Topics:  commodities grains sorghum