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Clifton lamb producer under pressure to shout smoko

WORKING OVERTIME: Reg Murphy from Clifton caught up with his mate Nigel Shatte from Dalveen at Queensland’s only weekly sheep and lamb sale in Warwick recently.
WORKING OVERTIME: Reg Murphy from Clifton caught up with his mate Nigel Shatte from Dalveen at Queensland’s only weekly sheep and lamb sale in Warwick recently. Toni Somes

CLIFTON lamb producer Reg Murphy was under pressure to shout the post-sale cuppa after success at last week's Warwick sheep sale.

The Darling Downs producer sold 47kg Dorset lambs for $130 at the state's only weekly lamb auction.

The fourth generation sheepman described the prices as "very reasonable" and his mate Dalveen landholder Nigel Shatte was quick to agree.

"Prices were firm to good," Mr Shatte said.

"And not bad at all considering what they have been in the past."

The Granite Belt local sold Coolalee hoggets weighing 50kg for $84 a head.

The duo were headed for the canteen when the Rural Weekly caught up with them and Mr Shatte agreed on the strength of sale results it was his mate's shout for smoko.

Meanwhile McDougall and Sons livestock agent Ross Ellis felt the Queensland market had eased with the type and quantity of lambs available.

He said the better types with "bloom and finish" were the least affected.

"But light number two lambs and light trade lambs felt the full market downturn," Mr Ellis said.

However high lamb prices for the Murphy family were complemented on their Ellangowan farm by a sound sorghum harvest and a strong grain market.

"We just finished harvesting and it wasn't too bad a year," Mr Murphy explained.

"Our sorghum came off at 1.5 tonnes to the acre and in the best places it was two tonne to the acre.

"That's not too bad when you consider prices have been between $315 and $305 a tonne."

As far as the 2014-15 Federal Budget, the Central Downs mates agreed it was important government's monitored spending.

And they weren't perturbed by plans to increase the official retirement age to 70.

"It will do those young fellas good to work a little longer," Mr Shatte laughed.

Both blokes admitted they were "past worrying" about celebrating seven decades and in their learned opinion "a bit more work had never hurt anyone".