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New curriculum difficult

CONFERENCE CATCH-UP: Isolated Children’s Parents’ Association delegates Sarah Cox, of Cracow, and Melissa Hopkins, of Wandoan, with Governor Penelope Wensley and Anna Radel, of Taroom, at the conference in Goondiwindi last week.
CONFERENCE CATCH-UP: Isolated Children’s Parents’ Association delegates Sarah Cox, of Cracow, and Melissa Hopkins, of Wandoan, with Governor Penelope Wensley and Anna Radel, of Taroom, at the conference in Goondiwindi last week. Contributed

WITH the national curriculum implementation high on the agenda, more than 200 delegates and guests made the trip to Goondiwindi for the Isolated Children's Parents' Association's Queensland annual conference.

Association president Andrew Pegler said parents with students enrolled in schools of distance education were frustrated with how the national curriculum was being implemented.

"As delivery of the new curriculum was introduced too quickly, it has placed significant pressure on students and teachers at distance education schools," Mr Pegler said.

"Many home tutors are experiencing ongoing problems with the quality and delivery of the material. The content and form of delivery are not home tutor or student friendly.

"The extra workload is putting strain on parents, most of whom are untrained teachers, trying to deliver the curriculum to their children."

He said the problems needed to be resolved because educational outcomes were being compromised.

"We are working through the problems with parents, Schools of Distance Education and Education Queensland and are forming an advisory committee comprising home tutor representatives to examine strategies to resolve the issues," he said.

Mr Pegler said work was also needed to improve technology to deliver materials to remote students.

Topics:  distance education education goondiwindi national curriculum