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Hybrid canola benefit shown in study

IMPROVED YIELDS: Territory manager Mitch Tuffley and canola technical manager Justin Kudnig agree that hybrids offer growers an opportunity to increase yield this season.
IMPROVED YIELDS: Territory manager Mitch Tuffley and canola technical manager Justin Kudnig agree that hybrids offer growers an opportunity to increase yield this season. Contributed

PACIFIC Seeds has welcomed research from the DPI and GRDC which found hybrid canola can out-yield conventional open pollinated varieties by as much as 0.4t/ha.

The trials, led by DPI research and development agronomists Leigh Jenkins and Rohan Brill and funded by DPI and GRDC, compared hybrids against OP varieties in 18 crop trials over two seasons at Trangie, Coonamble and Nyngan.

A statement from the DPI said "hybrids out-performed OP varieties by 0.4 t/ha, due mainly to larger seed size (resulting in better establishment), early vigour and higher grain yield."

It also stated that "hybrid canola offers growers a real opportunity to increase grain yield this growing season".

Pacific Seeds canola technical manager Justin Kudnig said the independent research was in line with the company's own research trial findings.

"Pacific Seeds recently conducted a $250,000 trials program and found that the more widely adapted hybrids can provide growers with increased gross returns over open pollinated varieties, in low rainfall zones of around $50 to $100/ha and up to $150 to $350/ha in the medium to higher rainfall zones," Mr Kudnig said.

Mr Kudnig also agreed with the DPI's finding that "the benefit of hybrids seemed to be greatest in the western regions where soil moisture is generally more limiting".

"Hybrid canola shows adaptability across low through to high rainfall districts throughout south-eastern Australia, and that growers can increase their gross returns per hectare by selecting key hybrid varieties," he said.

In addition to the yield and oil advantages hybrids can bring, Mr Kudnig said the herbicide tolerant hybrids offered more options in the cropping rotations, improving overall system profitability.

"In addition to the herbicide technology employed in many canola hybrids, the higher biomass allows for enhanced weed competitiveness compared to OP varieties, meaning a cleaner paddock and lower weed burden for the following rotation."