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Firms unite to help drought-stricken producers

Steve Schmidt (Schmidt Grazing Industries, Charleville), with Philp Brodie Grain representative Jerry O’Sullivan, Brian Egan (Aussie Helpers), Andrea Brodie (PBA Feeds), Lisa Matthews (Philp Brodie Grain) and PBA Feeds logistics manager Philip Best at the Charleville showgrounds.
Steve Schmidt (Schmidt Grazing Industries, Charleville), with Philp Brodie Grain representative Jerry O’Sullivan, Brian Egan (Aussie Helpers), Andrea Brodie (PBA Feeds), Lisa Matthews (Philp Brodie Grain) and PBA Feeds logistics manager Philip Best at the Charleville showgrounds.

TWO Darling Downs feed companies have joined forces to help the plight of the drought-affected primary producers in western Queensland.

Toowoomba-based agribusiness companies PBA Feeds and Philp Brodie Grain have donated a B-double load of feed and grain, which was sent to cattle producers in the Charleville district last week.

John Hart Transport, of Clifton, transported it to the Charleville showgrounds, where it was distributed to graziers with hay collected through the Buy a Bale ( http://www.buyabale.com.au) program last Tuesday. G and D partners also played a role in transportation of the product.

Director of PBA Feeds Peter Brodie said the lick and grain was distributed through the state-wide charity, Aussie Helpers.

"We were watching the Sunrise program on television one morning, and saw that people were donating hay so we thought the lick would be ideal to go with the hay to give stock a more balanced feed," Mr Brodie said.

"It is designed to try and save the nucleus of western producers' breeding herds so, when the drought breaks, they will at least have some breeders remaining to go on with," he said.

Mr Brodie said his company's philosophy was to give money back to where they made money.

"As a company, we always look to give back to the communities that support us and we have been very busy during this drought and we thought it was timely to give back to some of the worst affected," he said.

"We just felt cattle producers out west were having a hard time and we wanted to help."

PBA Feeds logistics manager Philip Best said the Charleville district hadn't traditionally been an area the company had supplied feed to in the past.1089121

ON THE ROAD: PBA Feeds director Peter Brodie, sales representative Will Bazley and logistics manager Philip Best with some of the 10 tonnes of Droughtbuster lick which was sent last week to drought-ravaged cattle producers in the Charleville district.
ON THE ROAD: PBA Feeds director Peter Brodie, sales representative Will Bazley and logistics manager Philip Best with some of the 10 tonnes of Droughtbuster lick which was sent last week to drought-ravaged cattle producers in the Charleville district. Linda Mantova

 

"However Brian Egan, from Aussie Helpers, is based at Charleville and it is very dire out there," Mr Best said.

Founding Aussie Helpers with his wife, Nerida, 11½ years ago, Brian Egan said the donation of product by the two companies was a great help to cattle producers in the Charleville district.

Mr Egan said the lick and grain donated was given out to farmers, along with the four road trains of hay already donated.

"For the past two or three weeks our volunteers have

travelled around the district deciding which were the most in need of assistance," he said.

"We feel the best way to know who is in need most is to meet them face to face."

Mr Egan said about 40 producers benefited from the donated feed.

"Everyone went home with a full truck load. It was an early Christmas present for them," he said.

Company representatives from PBA Feeds and Philp Brodie Grain accompanied the feed to Charleville to speak with producers on how to best utilise their products.

"It was great that the guys from PBA came out and they got to experience farmers breaking down in tears in front of them when they talked about their stock dying and running out of water," Mr Egan said.

Mr Best said the product that went to Charleville consisted of a custom-made Droughtbuster Lick.

"We sent 20 tonne of lick on the truck, as well as 12 tonnes of grain by-product from our other factory," he said.

Mr Brodie said he was confident the product went towards helping those producers who were struggling to keep breeding stock alive.

The Charleville showgrounds was the location for the Aussie Helpers organisation to distribute the donated lick, grain and hay to drought-affected cattle producers.
The Charleville showgrounds was the location for the Aussie Helpers organisation to distribute the donated lick, grain and hay to drought-affected cattle producers.

Topics:  drought drought support