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Dirt-on-your-boots inspiration for artists in Lockyer Valley

SUPPORT ACT: The Brimblecombe family – Linton, Kate, Melinda and Mitchell – opened their Lockyer Valley farm for the innovative Land Art Project.
SUPPORT ACT: The Brimblecombe family – Linton, Kate, Melinda and Mitchell – opened their Lockyer Valley farm for the innovative Land Art Project. Contributed

IT'S dirt-on-your-boots art therapy in the Lockyer Valley, where an innovative project is linking farmers and artists in a creative move to rebuild a community devastated by natural disaster.

The Land Art project has involved four artists staying with four farming families for several weeks, culminating in a collaborative exhibition next Friday at the Lockyer Rural Lifestyle Expo.

Cassandra Pulver, of Lockyer Valley Arts Corps, said the project was developed in response to her community's ongoing struggle to recover from the 2011 and 2013 floods.

"The aim of the project is to reflect a farmer's day to day life, where they are creative by necessity.

"We wanted to give farmers a chance to see what they do through the eyes of multi-artform artists and to encourage our communities to see themselves as creative and resilient."

She said there were two local artists as well as two Sunshine Coast artists involved in the rural residency program.

"It really was a case of getting both artists and farmers to step outside their everyday experiences and celebrate farm life and landscape," Ms Pulver said.

"Already my feedback from farmers has been very positive. They've enjoyed the opportunity to sit down and consider their environment from someone else's perspective."

She said the project was initially developed as a result of advice from cross-agency working groups, which recognised farmers needed innovative social and mental health assistance.

Creative Recovery Network director Scotia Monkivitch said initiatives like the Land Arts Project had the capacity to bring communities together in a supportive and engaged way.

"While celebrating creativity and the arts within a rural framework, arts projects like this bring together individuals in a supportive social environment and offer a new perspective of our landscape and our interaction with it through the eyes of farmers and artists," Ms Monkivitch said.

This week the four south-east Queensland artists will give their host families and farm neighbours a sneak preview of their finished work.

The Land Art Project finished work will then be officially unveiled at a combined exhibition as part of the Lockyer Rural Lifestyle Expo on May 23 at Gatton Showgrounds.