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Crochet Warriors spread word on saving reefs

Felix the octopus stands out in the middle of a section of “bleached” coral that will form part of the display.
Felix the octopus stands out in the middle of a section of “bleached” coral that will form part of the display. Mark Wilton

AN OVERWHELMING response from participants has produced enough crocheted coral to double the size of the Territory Wildlife Park’s centrepiece to be unveiled on World Threatened Species Day.

What started as an idea to create a small piece of a coral reef with wool to highlight the plight of coral reefs around the world captured the imagination of more than 100 “Crochet Warriors” from around the country.

Territory Wildlife Park artistic narrative officer Jasmine Jan said she had been amazed at the response to the art program, which started late last year.

“Initially we were going to do three, two-metre pylons representing the various stages of the reef.

“But the response was so big that we have ended up with enough coral to do six pylons,” Ms Jan said.

“I put a call out in May to the people interstate to start sending their contributions in so that we could find out how much we had to work with.

“Crochet Warriors” Lesley Every, Janelle Northcott, Patsy Creswick, Lyn Bates and Barbara Williams all contributed enormously to the reef project.
“Crochet Warriors” Lesley Every, Janelle Northcott, Patsy Creswick, Lyn Bates and Barbara Williams all contributed enormously to the reef project. Mark Wilton

“And then every week through May and June I have been getting bags of coral in the mail, which has been fantastic.

“A lot of the local ladies even took their crocheting with them when they went on holidays interstate.

“There will be two pylons of brightly coloured coral, the second pair will be half coloured and half starting to fade and the third pair will be all bleached coral if we have enough of the white.”

Ms Jan said the whole purpose of the installation was to raise awareness about what was happening to our coral reefs around the world because of global warming and rising sea temperatures.

While the installations will be strictly hands off once they go on display at the park in September, Ms Jan said she was hoping to have enough coral left over to build a “tactile” reef.

“Because there are so many colours and textures and elements to the poles, we have found that many people want to touch it.

“While that won’t be possible once it is on display I am hoping that we will be able to build one for that specific purpose.”

The project is set to be unveiled on September 7.


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