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Abattoir workers reunited

STORY TIME: Toowoomba-based author Dot Moore with Liz Mikkelson and her grand-daughter Pearl.
STORY TIME: Toowoomba-based author Dot Moore with Liz Mikkelson and her grand-daughter Pearl. Sandra Mcewan

IT IS an industry renowned for its colour and its characters and author Dot Moore has offered a revealing insight into the region's meat industry, in her history of the Wallangarra Meatworks.

Mrs Moore's book, Home in the Pig's Back: A story of the Wallangarra Meatworks, was launched in January at a reunion of people formerly involved with the abattoir.

More than 170 people with links to the Anderson family's plant returned to the border township for a long-awaited get together on Australia Day.

Like Mrs Moore, they were back to celebrate a connection to the meatworks, which was opened in 1923 by local graziers, as an alternative to transporting stock to city abattoirs.

In 1934, its directors entered into negotiations with Alfred Anderson, known then as the "Sausage King" and who had a successful plant at Byron Bay.

Mr Anderson eventually bought the operation outright in 1937.

Despite various challenges, the plant continued as one of the region's primary employers and industrial operations until the early 1980s.

The colourful history of the works is outlined in Mrs Moore's compelling book.

Much of the history of the meatworks was collected by her late husband, Ron Moore, who was a former abattoir manager.

For more information about the book or to buy copies phone the Wallangarra Jennings Progress Association on 4684 3300.

Topics:  cattle livestock reunion