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A collective resource on caring for the coast

LAUNCHED: Maree Prior, projects development officer and co-ordinator with Noosa Integrated Catchment Assn and Cooloola Cove Assn Inc and Michael Lowe, Environmental Services and contractor at the launch of the booklet.
LAUNCHED: Maree Prior, projects development officer and co-ordinator with Noosa Integrated Catchment Assn and Cooloola Cove Assn Inc and Michael Lowe, Environmental Services and contractor at the launch of the booklet. Contributed

The booklet, produced by the Cooloola Coastcare Association Inc, will help give people a better understanding and knowledge about these unique areas of our natural environment.

Created under the Caring for Country grant scheme, "Coloola Cove Wetlands and Waterways" is a good illustration of just what can be produced by a community group, with help from the Burnett Mary Regional Group, the Mary River Catchment Coordinating Committee, Great Sandy Biosphere and Cooloola Nature.

The project was instigated when a few locals became concerned about invasive weeds threatening small waterways.

Prime problem was setaria grass, a pasture species relic from the days in which there was a cattle property being developed in the area around what is now the Cooloola Cove village.

The booklet is a compilation of knowledge gained during the removal and restoration process, as what seemed to be a fairly simple project that threw up many more questions than there were answers.

Featuring a cover design by Sarah Mitchell the booklet is well illustrated with many plants, animals and habitat photos as well as diagrammatic maps.

Texts contributed by a number of authors explain in a sequential manner various processes that create and maintain these small waterways.

Frogs, birds, mangrove watch, and cultural heritage are all mentioned.

There is a depressingly long list of weeds found in the Cooloola Cove Wetlands which should be read in conjunction with the Gympie Regional Council's et al leaflet "Beauties and Beasties" that describes alternative native species that can be planted.

The list of marine fish amply illustrates the importance of keeping Tin Can Bay in as pristine a condition as possible.

The better water quality run-off from the creeks rehabilitated in the project helps.

Also relying heavily on Tin Can Bay are huge numbers of migratory birds that come each year and use mud flats for feeding, either at their destination or a as fuel stop when going further south.

While not quite a "How to", the booklet is an excellent example of what like-minded residents working as a community can achieve.

Guest speaker, Robert Whyte, author of the now iconic "The Creek in our Backyard" said the Wetlands booklet takes the reader gently through the way to a better understanding and knowledge of the natural environment.

Topics:  coastcare environment landcare


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